What is the ‘Ethical Commons’ program?

The Humane Party’s “Ethical Commons” program is a means whereby the HP helps foster the growth of other ethics- and science-based organizations and political parties in other countries.  Through this program, the HP allows anyone anywhere—without prior notice to and without prior, express, written consent of the HP—to freely copy, translate, modify, and re-use the following HP written literature under the following conditions:

  • the derivative use is of one or more of the following pieces of HP literature (text only, not associated images or trade names)
    • Humane Party Platform
    • Humane Party Oath
    • Humane Party Vision, Values, Mission, and Goals Statements
    • Humane Party Code of Ethics and Standards of Conduct
  • the actual and apparent intent of the derivative use must be to protect and, ultimately, liberate other animals
  • the derivative use does not state or imply that the Humane Party endorses or is associated with any particular party, organization, candidate, or other person or entity
  • the derivative use may credit or thank the HP but does not otherwise include the Humane Party name or any HP logo, motto, slogan, or other HP trademarks

Any uses of HP-owned intellectual property not meeting the above still require express, prior written consent of the HP.

Please feel free to take advantage of the Ethical Commons program so as to accelerate the founding and growth of your organization.

Deeper Shade of Green | The Humane Party

Deeper Shade of Green | The Humane Party (2010)

Is the Humane Party alone?

No. Ethics- and science-based political parties are rising up all around the world to replace violence-based parties.  Here are links to several new political parties:

Please feel free to send suggestions for additional parties to be included in this list.

The Humane Party is not affiliated with any of the other parties in this list and cannot vouch for these parties, their candidates, or policies.  However, they do appear to be moving in the right direction as part of a global paradigm shift in what political parties are, what they do, and who they represent.

 

Humane Party buttons

Humane Party buttons

 

What is the Abolition Amendment?

The Abolition Amendment is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution.  Upon ratification, the Abolition Amendment will abolish slavery with respect to all animals, thereby putting an immediate end to the meat, dairy, egg, and other exploitation- and killing-based industries.  In so doing, the Abolition Amendment represents the fruit of decades of labor by animal rights activists, environmentalists, and vegan advocates in the U.S.

The final version of the Abolition Amendment was published on Abolition Day, December 6, 2016.  The full text of the Abolition Amendment appears in the following image.

Abolition Amendment | Final Draft | December 6 2016

Abolition Amendment | Final Draft | December 6 2016

What is Platform Day?

The Humane Party’s Platform Day—April 22—is the day on which the Humane Party releases its biennial platform.

Platform Day occurs on the same day as Earth Day.  This date was chosen for Platform Day because it is also the date of the anniversary of the Humane Party’s initial launch—i.e., the HP’s “birthday”—, which occurred on April 22, 2009.

What are the primary effects and impact of the APE Amendment?

The primary effects and impact of the American Primate Emancipation Amendment (or APE Amendment) are those of:

1. Abolishing slavery with respect to all primates. Just as the 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution served to abolish the institution of human slavery within the U.S., the APE Amendment abolishes the institution of slavery for all other primates. Such abolition means that primates—including apes, monkeys, chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and several other mammalian species who are particularly closely related to homo sapiens—can no longer be treated as “property” and therefore can no longer be used for entertainment purposes, vivisection, or other forms of exploitation.

2. Recognizing the availability of the writ of habeas corpus for protecting the rights of all primates. The writ of habeas corpus is a key procedural mechanism for protecting the substantive rights of individuals in the American legal system. This mechanism allows demand, through a legal proceeding, that either (i) an adequate reason for holding an individual in captivity be demonstrated or (ii) the individual be released. By explicitly making the writ of habeas corpus available for safeguarding the rights of all primates, the APE Amendment activates a key vehicle for ensuring that other primates are free from slavery not only in theory but in actuality.

3. Providing a guardian ad litem when necessary to protect the rights of a primate. In the American legal system, when an individual does not have the capacity to properly protect his or her rights (e.g., an infant), a guardian ad litem can be appointed to act on behalf of the incapacitated individual. By explicitly making the guardian ad litem procedural mechanism available for use with respect to all primates, the APE Amendment activates another key vehicle for ensuring that other primates are free from slavery not only in theory but in actuality.

4. Eliminating the 13th Amendment exception for slavery in criminal cases. The language of the 13th Amendment provides an exception to its general prohibition of human slavery, namely, an exception for “punishment for a crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted”. The APE Amendment eliminates this exception, both for humans and for all other primates.  In closing this loophole, the APE Amendment directly affects humans and enhances humans’ civil rights in the United States.  This enhanced protection of human rights is particularly relevant and important in America today, where the Democrat-Republican bloc has incarcerated the largest population of prisoners in the world and has transformed the criminal justice system into a for-profit prison system.

APE Amendment

APE Amendment

Who is required to take the Humane Party Oath?

Three categories of people are required to take the Humane Party Oath:

  • candidates running for public office who are endorsed by any Humane Party entity
  • members of the board of directors of any Humane Party entity
  • officers of any Humane Party entity

An “officer”, for the purposes of this requirement, is anyone whose role in a Humane Party entity calls for (i) managing the activities of other HP team members or (ii) speaking on behalf of the HP to the general public. Thus, for example, a photographer who volunteers to take photographs at an event for the HP but who does not manage or direct the activities of any other HP team member would not be required to take the HP Oath. Meanwhile, a HP team member who interviews, selects, or directs the above photographer would be required to take the HP Oath.

What is the APE Amendment?

APE Amendment image by Christopher Censullo

APE Amendment image by Christopher Censullo

The American Primate Emancipation Amendment—or simply the “APE” Amendment, for short—is a proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The effect of the APE Amendment is to:

  • abolish slavery with respect to all primates in the United States of America
  • recognize habeas corpus mechanism for protecting the rights of all primates
  • recognize guardian ad litem mechanism for protecting the rights of all primates
  • eliminate the 13th Amendment’s exception for criminal cases

The text of the APE Amendment is modeled on that of the 13th Amendment. After years of development by the Humane Party legal team, versions of the APE Amendment text were subjected to three separate periods for public comment during 2015. After all public comments had been reviewed and final revisions made, the final version of the APE Amendment was signed into its current form by Clifton Roberts, then serving as Chief Executive Officer of the Humane Party, on October 19, 2015.

The final text of the APE Amendment was published on the first annual American Abolition Day, December 6, 2015.

The full text of the American Primate Emancipation Amendment reads as follows:

Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude of any primate shall exist within the United States or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
Section 2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall be available to ensure the rights of all primates.
Section 3. Every primate who does not have a guardian shall be provided a guardian ad litem when necessary to protect the primate’s rights.
Section 4. Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

How can I volunteer for, work for, and otherwise participate with the Humane Party?  

VOLUNTEER:  To volunteer for the Humane Party, simply submit the volunteer application. Another Humane Party volunteer will contact you soon thereafter.

JOBS / EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:  The Humane Party does not have any paid employees; the HP is an all-volunteer organization.

STUDENT INTERNSHIPS / EXTERNSHIPS:  Law students are encouraged to contact the Humane Party regarding legal internships / externships.

PARTICIPATE:  Humane Party supporters can help by spreading the word about the U.S.’s first—and currently only—animal rights party whenever the opportunity arises.  Let others know that there is now an American political party that shares their values.