What is the ‘Ethical Commons’ program?

The Humane Party’s “Ethical Commons” program is a means whereby the HP helps foster the growth of other ethics- and science-based organizations and political parties in other countries.  Through this program, the HP allows anyone anywhere—without prior notice to and without prior, express, written consent of the HP—to freely copy, translate, modify, and re-use the following HP written literature under the following conditions:

  • the derivative use is of one or more of the following pieces of HP literature (text only, not HP-associated images or trade names)
    • Humane Party Platform
    • Humane Party Oath
    • Humane Party Vision, Values, Mission, and Goals Statements
    • proposed legislation (e.g., Abolition Amendment)
  • the actual and apparent intent of the derivative use must be to protect and, ultimately, liberate other animals
  • the derivative use does not state or imply that the Humane Party endorses or is associated with any particular party, organization, candidate, or other person or entity
  • the derivative use may credit or thank the HP but does not otherwise include the Humane Party name or any HP logo, motto, slogan, or other HP trademarks

Any uses of HP-owned intellectual property not meeting the above still require express, prior written consent of the HP.

Please feel free to take advantage of the Ethical Commons program so as to accelerate the founding and growth of your organization.

Deeper Shade of Green | The Humane Party

Deeper Shade of Green | The Humane Party (2010)

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What is the “Violence Is Not Entertainment” (VINE) Act?

The “Violence Is Not Entertainment” (VINE) Act is a proposed update of U.S. intellectual property law.  Under the VINE Act, animal abusers can no longer establish, maintain, or enforce intellectual property (“IP”) rights in material that includes abuse of a live animal.

The VINE Act directly impacts two bodies of IP law at the federal level—copyright and trademark—and serves as a model for analogous legislation at the state level.  Drafting of a separate act abolishing patent eligibility for animal-abuse methods and devices is also underway.

COPYRIGHT

Materials described in 17 U.S.C. 102—such as still photographs, video recordings, or audio recordings—will be excluded from copyright eligibility if those materials record acts of animal abuse.  For example, property rights under U.S. law no longer attach to materials recording bullfights, dogfights, cockfights, horse races, dog races, animal sacrifices, vivisection, bestiality, or rodeo events, regardless of where those materials are recorded.

This portion of the VINE Act depropertizes only those materials that visibly or audibly record abuse of an actual, living animal.  For example, illustrations, animations, and computer-generated simulations of animal abuse are unaffected by the VINE Act.

TRADEMARK / SERVICE MARK

Marks for goods and services that necessarily require death or mutilation will no longer be registrable with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”), and such marks that have already been registered will no longer be recognized as property under U.S. law.  For example, the USPTO no longer grants, renews, or otherwise recognizes registration of marks wherein the identified goods include dead body parts, such as fur, skin, bone, ivory, or muscle tissue.

The VINE Act does not restrict, encumber, or otherwise affect the creation, financing, production, possession, reproduction, distribution, transmission, hosting, storing, advertising, marketing, publication, sale, rental, loan, display, viewing, or consumption of animal-abuse materials. Rather, the VINE Act merely withdraws Congress-created intellectual property status from such materials.  Therefore, free speech rights under the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution are unaffected by the VINE Act.

An initial draft of the VINE Act will be published for public comments and editorial suggestions later in 2016.  Suggestions received from the public during the public-comment period will be reviewed, and the text of the VINE Act will be revised to incorporate such suggestions as appropriate.