Will animal-welfare laws still be necessary after abolition has occurred?

Even after abolition has been achieved, animal welfare laws will still be necessary to ensure that members of other species who accidentally come into contact with humans can be safely returned to areas that are safe from humans.

Yes. Even after the meat, dairy, egg, vivisection, and other violence- and exploitation-based industries have been forever expunged from U.S. territory, and even after the legal status of all animals has been changed from “property” to “persons” such that the institution of slavery and “ownership” of sentient beings has been forever abolished in all U.S. jurisdictions, animal-welfare laws will still be necessary.

For example:

Returning adventurous animals to safety.  In a post-abolition world, other animals, such as the adventurous reptile seen in the photo below, will continue to innocently wander into human-dominated areas. Other species do not recognize anthropogenic, anthropocentric boundaries.  But crossing into human-dominated areas represents an extreme peril for virtually all other species.

Even after abolition has been achieved, animal welfare laws will still be necessary to ensure that members of other species who accidentally come into contact with humans can be safely returned to areas that are safe from humans.
Even after abolition has been achieved, animal welfare laws will still be necessary to ensure that members of other species who accidentally come into contact with humans can be safely returned to areas that are safe from humans. Photo courtesy of Jessica and Paul Dowell © 2017. All rights reserved.

Animal-welfare laws will, therefore, still be needed for establishing procedures for returning such animals to areas where they can be safe from intentional human violence—unfortunately, violent, animal-abusing criminals are likely to still exist even after abolition has been achieved—or from accidental human violence (e.g., being hit by a vehicle).

Habitat-protection and crime-victim-rehabilitation laws.  The “adventurous animal” case is but one of many examples of animal-welfare laws that will remain necessary even after abolition has been achieved. Other examples include (i) all manner of environmental-protection laws, those designed to prevent human encroachment on or destruction of other animals’ homes and ecosystems, and (ii) animal-refugee or crime-survivor laws, those designed to help find, rescue, rehabilitate, and repatriate animals who are victims of kidnapping, trafficking, and enslavement.  These crimes will, in all likelihood, continue to be committed against both humans and other animals, even after the Abolition Amendment has been passed.  Animal-welfare laws will, therefore, continue to be needed to ensure that survivors of such ordeals can safely return to a normal life.